Author Topic: Arrangements  (Read 8881 times)

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Offline brianleach

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #15 on: Tuesday, April 29 2008 04:03PM GMT-1 »
A definite advantage I should say in that you are used to your right and left hands doing different things (no smart comments please)

I can play a fair number of tunes all quite slowly and all quite basic eg Wynster Processional ,Shepherds Hey, Cock of the North (do you detect a Morris bias!!) plus nursery rhymes carols etc all from various music books. Some have the bass chords shown others don't. I don't find it easy "hearing" the basses going back to the music versus ear discussion.

I can do, albeit rather slowly, the two hands providing they are whole notes. Fitting the part notes is a  bit more hit or miss as the oompah seems to go to pot.

Just more slow practice I guess.

Brian

Offline Shelley

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #16 on: Tuesday, April 29 2008 05:03PM GMT-1 »
Anyway - to answer the first question - yes the music is nearly always arranged by one member of the band who writes out parts for the rest of us and we tweak it from there.

Thanks Squeezy!
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Offline firebird

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #17 on: Tuesday, April 29 2008 06:34PM GMT-1 »
Quote from: Squeezy
I also think that it's a myth that some people can't learn by ear - I've never met anyone who couldn't sing happy birthday or their favourite songs from the charts!

Interesting point this - I think it's much easier with voice than with an instrument. Somehow to me, it's an awful lot easier to tune the voice into the 'steps' (thirds, fifths etc) between notes than it is to play the very same thing on an instrument. With sharps and flats it doesn't equate logically, whereas with your voice you're never thinking about it like that, if that makes sense? That said, I am finding learning by heart (if not yet quite learning by ear!) is a heck of a lot easier on the melodeon - perhaps there's more muscle memory involved that with other instruments (or more than with the flute anyway).

Brian - I'm fascinated by what you said about being able to read to music, but not rhythm - to me the two are basically inseparable (not that I'm great with rhythym, but I manage) - with each note you get the two pieces of information, the pitch and the length of the note. Combined with the time signature, there's your rhythm surely? Now speed, yes, there I see your point - I do find that hard until I've heard someone play it :)
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Offline brianleach

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday, April 30 2008 07:39AM GMT-1 »
I think you're right. Somehow the voice is part of us and we control it directly whereas with a musical instrument you have to convert the sound into a note first. So unless you are completely comfortable with a particular instrument you are always in effect trying to do two jobs at once ie hear the note and play it on the instrument. I suspect this is why John has no problem playing by ear as he knows his boxes inside out as it were. Does that make any sense??

Turning to the note/rhythm thing I understand what you're saying but I think with me it goes back to very early days. I struggled to learn the particular notes on the recorder (remember I was about 6 or 7!!) and the "counting" thing was completely ignored, hence my problem!!

You'd be surprised how difficult I find it to get a piece to sound right even with all the notes in front of me and believe me a tune is quite unrecognisable if the rhythm is wrong.

Brian

Offline pete flood

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #19 on: Thursday, May 1 2008 03:52PM GMT-1 »
Generally we tend to arrange on Sibelius (apart from Andy and Benji who use Logic Score - the cheapskates), which is great for practicalities like telling you when you're writing out of the instrument's range - I used to spend hours checking things in the composers bible, Walter Piston's Orchestration, a book far too keen to perpetuate the myth that composing is an arcane art only accessible to geniuses and the rich.

In Bellowhead the challenge is to leave enough flexibility in the arrangement for the piece to take on a life of its own - it far too easy to give in to the inner perfectionist and over egg the pudding. As a band though, we're getting good at knowing when to use the dots and when to abandon them.

Offline Shelley

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #20 on: Thursday, May 1 2008 05:26PM GMT-1 »
I had no idea Sibelius was so clever - thanks for your answer Pete!  I'd love to see what a Bellowhead score looks like.
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Offline Nick

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #21 on: Thursday, May 1 2008 06:21PM GMT-1 »
This begs a question Pete: do you have dots for your percussion?

I'd be interested to see what the intro to Rochdale Coconut Dance looks like written down  :D

Cheers

Nick
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Offline pete flood

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #22 on: Thursday, May 1 2008 09:03PM GMT-1 »
yep, sometimes - worryingly more and more so! I used to be pretty much left to my own devices (thankfully Rochdale has no score). Like an idiot I complained pretty vociferously about not even being given a structure to work on, so now I get all kinds of precisely-notated nonsense. I tend to ditch any dots at the earliest opportunity - drumming's often about creating a feeling of continuity, and it generally doesn't happen if you're fixating on a page of music.

Offline Nick

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #23 on: Friday, May 2 2008 12:29AM GMT-1 »
So when Paul S writes 37 bars rest followed by a ting on the triangle, you tend to ignore him?  :D
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Offline Music Festival Photos

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #24 on: Friday, May 2 2008 06:57AM GMT-1 »
So when Paul S writes 37 bars rest followed by a ting on the triangle, you tend to ignore him?  :D

The last couple of times I've been to see Paul (and Paul) I think it was 165 bars!!!!!!!!!!!!

« Last Edit: Friday, May 2 2008 07:00AM GMT-1 by Music Festival Photos »

Catharine

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Re: Arrangements
« Reply #25 on: Friday, May 2 2008 08:20PM GMT-1 »
From an 'artistic' point of view, I notice that I spend a lot of time 'copying' patterns until I 'get them' and then after doing them repeatedly they become 'internalised' and I'm able to render designs spontaneously with embellishments, or less detail, or fused with other designs and it works. I wonder if the same thing applies to music?